Messages, Writing-the-Message

Any Questions?

Any questions? A Sermon on Revelation 1:4b-8 (Proper 29 / Ordinary 34, Year B)

Introduction

Asked to cover the fifth Apprentice study on ‘Questioning’.

Scripture

Revelation: an odd choice?  John is expressing a revealed truth from a vision – surely no questions here?  I love its symbols and imagery, its faith, beauty and terror.  Have I blinded my intellect with emotion?  But this Book is not so crude, let’s look at this praise (doxology).

  • V4a. Personal testimony vs church tradition – safety in numbers, a moderating influence.
  • V4b. A personal Revelation from the Spirit – not to be kept to oneself, but tested.
  • V5.  The example of Jesus, whose credibility is his life, teaching, sacrifice and resurrection.
  • V6.  The experience, wisdom, witness and example of billions of people over 2,000 years.
  • V7.  Prophecy (this passage from Daniel, another apocalypse – literature).
  • V8.  God is sovereign over all time and space.  We can learn from creation and history.

Reason

  • Questioning is not looking for excuses not to commit,
  • Nor is questioning to win an argument (“are you asking me or telling me?”):
    • The emphasis on debate and winning arguments is a Western cultural obsession.
    • It comes from the Western Church – not God and our Eastern Religion!
  • It is not looking for a sign (Wood Allen quote, Desmond Tutu bio, naked men story).
  • Not to change God’s mind (or is it?), but to develop ours in His presence.
  • Not to get a perfect, rigid, unmerciful, human system of philosophy.
    • We are not looking for a neat theology that is divorced from a messy world.
    • God is perfectly holy and yet merciful, through the Trinity – our doctrine is not!

Practical/Application

Why ask Questions?

  • Rudyard Kipling (a journalist, writing a story for children) said:

“I keep six honest serving-men

(They taught me all I knew);

Their names are What and Why and When

And How and Where and Who.”

  • If we ask questions rather than accept received (imposed?) wisdom, we ‘own’ it.
  • If asked, I can probably deal with a question that I have asked and answered … or not?
  • We question to try and make us more complete – this implies change.  Ouch!
  • Paradox: we ask questions expecting to possess less knowledge, but more wisdom & trust.

Conclusion – Any Questions?

Let’s put some perspective on this.

  • Better to ask questions than to assume  = makes an ass of you and me!
  • Questions should not worry us – the motives of those asking the questions should!
  • Equally, we should not be worried about not getting neat answers.
    • It’s still worth asking the questions, for all sorts of reasons.
    • Knowledge will pass away but faith, hope and love are eternal.
  • Jesus’ mission was to show Himself to all people, so they can say “who is this?” and answer “Jesus is Lord.”

Published by

Simon

Simon writes science fiction stories about individuals caught up in huge events, where outer conflict is reflected in their rich inner lives. As the son of an immigrant, he writes about people who don't always fit in. In his day job, Simon is an engineering consultant of many years’ experience. He has been lucky enough to speak at conferences in the UK, USA, Canada and Australia.

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