March on the Deniers!

I am pleased to announce that my short story ‘March on the Deniers!’ is being published.

FICTION on the WEB

Excited, or what? You guessed – I’m excited!

The story will appear in FICTION on the WEB, which is run by Charlie Fish, a short story writer and screenwriter – thanks, Charlie! I will let him tell you about his site:

FICTION on the WEB is a labour of love. Every single story on here is hand-picked and carefully edited by me. I don’t have a staff, and I don’t make any money. I do this because I want to give authors a chance to get their work out there, and I love sharing great stories with the world.

FICTION on the WEB has been online since 1996, which makes it the oldest short stories website on the Internet. Hundreds of stories have been enjoyed by hundreds of thousands of readers. This new incarnation of the site aims to take advantage of the latest trends in connectivity while keeping things nice and simple.”

If you want to support Charlie you can do so on his Patreon site.

What’s it all about?

‘March on the Deniers!’ is set in the delightfully-named suburb of Nudgee, near Brisbane, Queensland. It is a climate-fiction (“Cli-Fi”) piece, but I’ve used humour to try and avoid being preachy. The humour is quite dark, and this is not a ‘G’-rated story.

I find having a definite location for a story helps, so the image at the head of this page is a little map of Nudgee after some sea-level rise and storm surge. As you can see, nearby Brisbane Airport is long gone! The flood map is generated by firetree.net, and you can find it here.

Monday, June 3rd

Yep, ‘March on the Deniers!’ will appear on this date, so go and have a read – and leave me some comments, please!

Best Regards, Simon

P.S. Sign on for regular, free speculative fiction Stories here!

Anatomy of a Writer’s Block

Writer’s block.  It’s a cliche, it’s not real – is it?

This Writer’s Block

In 2010 I started writing my first novel.  (We’ll forget about the train wreck of a novel I wrote in the 1990s).  It was planned as part of a trilogy called When I Was, Other Than, What I Now Am, which is a quote from a short story by Greg Bear.

Greg Bear, SF Author
Greg Bear

By late 2012 I thought I had finished writing When I Was (HO-HO-HO, I’m still working on the latest draft in 2018) and I moved onto Other Than.

With the benefit of hindsight, this book was probably suffering from Second-system syndrome.  I deliberately kept the first one simple, with one main protagonist and everything written from his point of view.  Not so with number two! There were three main protagonists and multiple points of view.  Did this contribute to the problem?  I’m still not sure.

Anyway, all seemed to be going well.  I was using a detailed chapter plan, a first for me as I recognised the complexity of what I was taking on.  The words came easily and the characters, who I knew well from book one, were doing most of the work for me.  By March 2013 I was 30,000 words in and then … nothing.  I just ran out of steam and could go no further.

What Happened?

Looking through the files from then it was a very creative time.  I sketched out ideas for several novels, including one that evolved into Jubilee (a current work in progress, see this page) and another book in my planned alternative-crime series, The Oxygen Thieves, which is still on my to-do list.  Perhaps I just burned myself out.  After all, we’d just moved to Australia with a stroppy teenager (don’t try this at home) and I was just setting out on a five-and-a-half-year roller-coaster ride on a massive project at work.  (Incidentally, this ride comes to an end at the end of this month: synchronicity, anyone?)

In the end, I wrote my way out of the block, by starting a new project, writing the first 12,000 words of The Daedalus Soul; since then I’ve built this story to 50,000 words.  Eventually, I was able to go back and take the first draft of Other Than to 80,000 words and a conclusion.

Postscript

Sometime later I discovered that another name for writers’ block is the thirty-thousand [word] doldrums.  My grateful thanks to Emma Darwin and her excellent blog site This Itch of Writing.  As always, Emma provides wise advice and a useful perspective, from which the aspiring writer can see a way ahead.  Thanks, Emma!    Emma Darwin, patron saint of struggling writers

Emma Darwin

I am now returning to Other Than in order to complete it (note to self: must learn to FINISH a novel).