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Review – The Artisan Heart

The Artisan Heart

Hayden Luschcombe is a brilliant paediatrician living in Adelaide with his wife Bernadette, an ambitious event planner. His life consists of soul-wrenching days at the hospital and tedious evenings attending the lavish parties organized by Bernadette.
When an act of betrayal coincides with a traumatic confrontation, Hayden flees Adelaide, his life in ruins. His destination is Walhalla, nestled in Australia’s southern mountains, where he finds his childhood home falling apart. With nothing to return to, he stays, and begins to pick up the pieces of his life by fixing up the house his parents left behind.
A chance encounter with a precocious and deaf young girl introduces Hayden to Isabelle Sampi, a struggling artisan baker. While single-handedly raising her daughter, Genevieve, and trying to resurrect a bakery, Isabelle has no time for matters of the heart. Yet the presence of the handsome doctor challenges her resolve. Likewise, Hayden, protective of his own fractured heart, finds something in Isabelle that awakens dormant feelings of his own.
As their attraction grows, and the past threatens their chance at happiness, both Hayden and Isabelle will have to confront long-buried truths if they are ever to embrace a future.

I have just finished reading ‘The Artisan Heart’ by Dean Mayes.  It’s a contemporary romance set mostly in the country Victoria town of Walhalla.  It is Dean’s fourth novel.  I should reveal that I’ve met Dean at Adelaide writers’ events, in various pubs, and he is a thoroughly nice guy!  (On this blog I have briefly reviewed his previous novel, ‘The Recipient’, which is a thriller with subtle supernatural elements.)

I was very pleased to be able to get a signed advanced copy (not a freebie, by the way), even though romance is not a genre that I would normally read.

Review

The novel opens in dramatic fashion with a betrayal, followed by a violent confrontation in the emergency room at Adelaide hospital.  The damaged protagonist returns to where he grew up.  He seeks shelter in a familiar place and with old family friends, but must also confront old pain and loss.  The romance at the core of the story grows slowly, but steadily, before the dramatic interventions of previous partners threaten to ruin everything.

One of the novel’s strengths, which it shares with ‘The Recipient’, is how it makes you care strongly for the characters, so strongly that I am reminded of novels by Neville Shute.  The two main characters are strong.  They are sympathetically drawn, but they are not without their faults, they carry scars from past relationships and they did not get on so well in the past.  These factors and many others mean that they are fully and satisfyingly realised on the page – and in the mind’s eye.

The cast of supporting characters is also vividly drawn, some at more length than others, but always to good effect on the plot and this reader.  The disability of a key supporting character is sensitively dealt with, heightening the sense of peril at times, but without being patronizing or clichéd.  The town of Walhalla and the surrounding hills also play their part and are well presented.  The slightly claustrophobic small town is hemmed in by the mountains, forming a cauldron for the romance and drama.  Economic use of description adds realism and atmosphere without getting in the way.

Dean adds his medical knowledge into the mix and several twists that stop the romantic story arc becoming predictable or too comfortable.  All these elements – plot, characters, setting, description and so on – are skilfully combined into a satisfying whole.

Conclusion

As I said at the start I would not normally read a romance, and this book is quite different from Dean’s previous novel.  Nevertheless, I was very pleasantly surprised and thoroughly enjoyed it.  Every time I thought I knew what was going to happen next Dean brought another element to the fore and kept me anxiously reading right to the end.  Thus fed and entertained, I shall be more open-minded in my future reading!

The Artisan Heart will be available in print and digital from September 1st, 2018.
See Dean’s website for details…

Sharing the Faith, Refining our Faith

‘Sharing the Faith, Refining our Faith’ – a sermon on Psalm 22/Mark 8:31-38 (Lent 2, Year B)

Aim

To show that we need to share the Good News that Jesus is the Christ – with each other and with unbelievers

Introduction – Sharing

‘You don’t have to go to church to be a Christian’, ‘my faith is my business’, ‘you can’t share your faith in a secular society’.

Psalm 22 tells us that God intends everyone to hear the Good News. It cuts across all divisions: rich and poor; in the church and outside; Jews and non-Jews; those living, dead and yet to be born.

The Psalmist says that everyone will turn to God and be blessed. How will they know that they should do this? How will they know how to turn to God?

Message for the Time

Peter had already confessed that Jesus is the Christ, but he totally misunderstands Jesus’ mission.  No one knows this until Peter speaks out, then Jesus corrects Peter and asks people to gather round – then Jesus explains his mission and that of his disciples.

Notice that Peter was correct given the religious assumptions of the day – but still wrong. The other disciples probably thought the same thing – but no one knew they were wrong until Peter spoke up! We all make mistakes, but if we view our faith as our possession and never discuss it then we will never discover anything new – our faith is closed, dead. We must share our faith and our experiences, thoughts and doubts with each other.

Message for Today

Notice also that Jesus then told his followers that they must deny self, take up their cross and follow Jesus (to death).  He also says that if we are ashamed of Jesus message, he will be ashamed of us on judgment day.  Clearly, Jesus expects us to share our faith with the faithless, even if this is not easy and earns us hostility.

What odd ideas do people have about: God – superstition, “a deal with God”; Jesus – “a good man”, “a wise teacher”; and the Holy Spirit – something for weirdos only?

What odd ideas do people have about our faith?  Are they hostile to Jesus because they think we think ourselves superior and are judging them? We need to tell them the truth about how we don’t deserve salvation!

We need to share our faith with each other, and with non-Christians, in order to make it real, vital and alive. We need to share the Good News, that Jesus is the Christ, that he died for us and is alive today as if our lives and their lives depended on it. Because it’s true!

A God of Love Who Judges

A God of love who Judges – Sermon on John 15:1-8 (Easter 5, Year B)

John 15:1-8

I am the true vine, and my Father is the gardener.  He cuts off every branch in me that bears no fruit, while every branch that does bear fruit he prunes so that it will be even more fruitful.  You are already clean because of the word I have spoken to you.  Remain in me, as I also remain in you. No branch can bear fruit by itself; it must remain in the vine. Neither can you bear fruit unless you remain in me.

I am the vine; you are the branches. If you remain in me and I in you, you will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing.  If you do not remain in me, you are like a branch that is thrown away and withers; such branches are picked up, thrown into the fire and burned.  If you remain in me and my words remain in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you.  This is to my Father’s glory, that you bear much fruit, showing yourselves to be my disciples.  John 15:1-8 [NIV]

A God of Love Who Judges

One of the other readings for today is 1John 4:7-21 on the theme ‘God is love’.  It’s a very popular reading with a nice cosy message.  The Gospel reading, quoting Jesus directly, is much more challenging.  Jesus says that we can be fruitful if we stay connected to Him, but he says that without Him we can do NOTHING, and will be fit only for burning.  Many struggle with this teaching.  How can a God of love reject, judge and punish people, they ask?

First…

…we must remember that such questions are self-centred.  God loves all people and wishes all to be saved, yet we know that many others are suffering because of our wealth.  Surely God will be angry with those who oppress and exploit the people He loves?  We can argue that it’s not our fault, but that doesn’t change the reality.

Second…

…I’m not sure that God does reject anyone.  Abraham said “Will not the Judge of all the earth do right?” when God was considering destroying Sodom [Gen 18:25].  God has sent Jesus to enable all to be saved, but will all accept Jesus?

Remember the ABC of becoming a Christian, a follower of Jesus?

  • Admit your sin – many say and will say “I don’t need forgiveness, I’ve done nothing wrong”.
  • Believe in Christ – many reject Jesus as not the only way to God, not the Christ; they see Jesus as just a good man or a prophet or they don’t think him important.
    • I have little fear for the devout of other faiths; I think that someone who has sincerely sought God will have no trouble recognising the Christ.
    • I do worry that those who have ignored God all their lives will not be able to change their habits, that they won’t be able to look past themselves.
  • Commit your life to Him – many refuse to commit or surrender to Christ.  In the West, people see their own individuality as paramount and they will not give up control to anyone, will not be in debt to anyone (except those we exploit, of course!) and want to stay in control of their ‘own’ lives.

Third…

…let us be reassured of God’s mercy to us.  None of us is in God’s presence because we deserve to be, or because of our own righteousness.  We are ‘clean’ because the word from Jesus has made us so, and that word is ‘forgiveness’.

Conclusion 

We can trust in Jesus our saviour and Lord.  I have no need to say more.  I have no time to say any more as we need to thank God and lift so many in need to him.  Amen

Any Questions?

Any questions? A Sermon on Revelation 1:4b-8 (Proper 29 / Ordinary 34, Year B)

Introduction

Asked to cover the fifth Apprentice study on ‘Questioning’.

Scripture

Revelation: an odd choice?  John is expressing a revealed truth from a vision – surely no questions here?  I love its symbols and imagery, its faith, beauty and terror.  Have I blinded my intellect with emotion?  But this Book is not so crude, let’s look at this praise (doxology).

  • V4a. Personal testimony vs church tradition – safety in numbers, a moderating influence.
  • V4b. A personal Revelation from the Spirit – not to be kept to oneself, but tested.
  • V5.  The example of Jesus, whose credibility is his life, teaching, sacrifice and resurrection.
  • V6.  The experience, wisdom, witness and example of billions of people over 2,000 years.
  • V7.  Prophecy (this passage from Daniel, another apocalypse – literature).
  • V8.  God is sovereign over all time and space.  We can learn from creation and history.

Reason

  • Questioning is not looking for excuses not to commit,
  • Nor is questioning to win an argument (“are you asking me or telling me?”):
    • The emphasis on debate and winning arguments is a Western cultural obsession.
    • It comes from the Western Church – not God and our Eastern Religion!
  • It is not looking for a sign (Wood Allen quote, Desmond Tutu bio, naked men story).
  • Not to change God’s mind (or is it?), but to develop ours in His presence.
  • Not to get a perfect, rigid, unmerciful, human system of philosophy.
    • We are not looking for a neat theology that is divorced from a messy world.
    • God is perfectly holy and yet merciful, through the Trinity – our doctrine is not!

Practical/Application

Why ask Questions?

  • Rudyard Kipling (a journalist, writing a story for children) said:

“I keep six honest serving-men

(They taught me all I knew);

Their names are What and Why and When

And How and Where and Who.”

  • If we ask questions rather than accept received (imposed?) wisdom, we ‘own’ it.
  • If asked, I can probably deal with a question that I have asked and answered … or not?
  • We question to try and make us more complete – this implies change.  Ouch!
  • Paradox: we ask questions expecting to possess less knowledge, but more wisdom & trust.

Conclusion – Any Questions?

Let’s put some perspective on this.

  • Better to ask questions than to assume  = makes an ass of you and me!
  • Questions should not worry us – the motives of those asking the questions should!
  • Equally, we should not be worried about not getting neat answers.
    • It’s still worth asking the questions, for all sorts of reasons.
    • Knowledge will pass away but faith, hope and love are eternal.
  • Jesus’ mission was to show Himself to all people, so they can say “who is this?” and answer “Jesus is Lord.”

Life in Adelaide: a Source of Inspiration for Writing

How is life in Adelaide a source of inspiration for your writing?

My Take On it

Members of the Writers in Adelaide group have been asked to contribute to a ‘blog chain’ on the subject of Adelaide as an inspiring place to write or inspiring me as a writer. I’ve just come back from the UK where every day was hot and sunny, and I’ve returned to a cold wet and windy Adelaide.  There are British programs on the TV.  I’m confused!

A Good Place

Adelaide, Jacarandas, Rainbow, Spring
One of My First Photos of Adelaide

Putting that aside, the Adelaide that I’m used to is good for writing.  It seems an open place to me, as the streets are wide, the houses are spread out and there’s plenty of parklands.  There is room here, room to think – room for my mind to roam and seek big ideas. The climate also helps, because we can keep our houses open (okay, maybe not in winter), open into the garden and the wider outside; we can look around, relax, explore, see the sights, do stuff and meet people.

Connectivity

Adelaide is a close place, a connected place.  Surprisingly for a city of 1.5 million people, everyone seems to know everyone else, usually via two or three acquaintances. I’m constantly amazed at how someone I know is also known by somebody else that I know, with apparently no reason for them to be connected: yet they are.  This is also conducive to writing because it reminds me that good stories are about people, characters and their connections.  A compelling story gives the reader empathy with our characters and their relationships and how they are motivated – driven – to act accordingly.  How we love to discover these connections, especially when the characters would rather they remained a secret.

When I was in the UK writing was a solitary existence, which was fine as I’m comfortable with my own company.  However, when I came here I joined Writers SA and found the Adelaide Writers Group, one of many here, and I haven’t looked back since.  I found a friendly group of people who give me positive criticism and support me, and in return I critique their pieces, learning about writing and growing my skills as a result.  Now, I know that there are writers’ groups all around the world, but I associate Adelaide with this sociability, meeting people down the pub who are also interested (okay, obsessed, let’s be honest) with writing.  Mixed together are earning writers willing to share their knowledge and my fellow amateurs.  Some of them are on this blog chain, and it’s my pleasure to be part of it.

Summing Up

So Adelaide is a good place to write, but it’s also inspiring in itself.  At the start of this post, I mentioned some similarities and differences between Adelaide and the UK, where I’ve spent most of my life, and about half of my writing life.  Adelaide feels like a cross between the UK and USA to me, familiar enough for me to feel at home and different enough to appreciate.  This mix is stimulating, and it’s led me to question a lot of things about life that, I guess, I had just taken for granted.  Coming here has changed who I am and challenged what I identify with.

Let’s hope it improves my writing!

What Others in the Blog chain Said…

Truth in Love

Speaking the Truth in Love – a Sermon on Mark 12:28-34 and Ruth 1:1-18 (Year B, Ordinary 31).

Mark 12:28-34

  • Although the man is wise – Jesus thinks so – I find him smug.
  • He says Jesus is right, but really he’s saying “we’re both right – aren’t we clever?”
  • Jesus says he is “not far from the Kingdom of God”:
    • Might expect Jesus to say The Teacher of the Law had ‘arrived’.
    • Maybe speaking the truth wasn’t enough – not spoken in love.
  • Contrast this with the words of my wife:
    • I had made some flippant comment about something on the TV;
    • She said “You can be a bit of an oaf sometimes” – how can you say that, just because it’s true?
    • What I hope she really meant was “don’t be an oaf, because I love you, and I know that you can be better than that.  You are worthy of my love and I am worthy of having a husband who is not an oaf.”

Ruth 1:1-18

  • Naomi has taught her daughters-in-law about God.
    • The women spend more time together – work/social convention.  [Muslim story]
    • She has no special knowledge of God but uses personal contact and example.
  • They have been together for a long time – a lot more ‘face time’ in those days.
  • Notice the contrast between the physical and the spiritual harvest.
    • They (and we) are used to good and bad times being defined by the harvest (work).
    • Naomi planted the spiritual seed in the good times and now harvests in the bad.
    • Orpah does not remain true when tested, but Ruth does.  Doesn’t God do the same?
  • Ruth ‘walked the walk’ AND ‘talked the talk.’

Meaning for Today

  • Today we face a difficult spiritual harvest.
  • Times are good in this country and people don’t seem to feel the need of God:
    • Some think that they can appease God by the superstition of religious ritual.
    • Some think that they can ignore God; he is distant, impersonal.
    • Some think that they can put God in a box, based on their theology.
  • However, the Bible tells us the truth about God:
    • Is personal, he is alive and wants to know us – all of us.
    • Wants us to know Him, this knowing not academic/theological, but personal.
    • God loves us, but He is Holy and those who reject Him are doomed.
  • We will not get through to non-Christians by just proclaiming the truth.
    • The teacher of the law did that – did you warm to him?  I didn’t!
    • People need to get to know God through us outside of a church.
    • We need non-Christian friends and we need to invest in them and believe in them for their sake, and because we value them for themselves.
    • Person of Jesus attractive; devotion to Him more attractive and reliable than knowledge.
  • Our challenge is to be disciples, to ‘speak the truth in love’, and ‘walk the talk’.  Integrity, consistency.

Book Review

Hi all,

I have been lucky enough to be asked to review the latest book by Adelaide writer Dean Mayes, called ‘The Artisan Heart’.  Now, everyone in Adelaide knows everyone else via two or three other people, so it’s no surprise that I know Dean.  I met him down the pub at an Adelaide lit drinks thing put on by SA Writers, and he’s a thoroughly nice bloke.  Now that I’ve disclosed that I’m biased…

…let’s get on with the review.  Well, sort of.  I am reading The Artisan Heart and thoroughly enjoying it so far, but I’m not finished or ready to review it.  Feeling a bit guilty about being so slack in my reading, I thought that I would mention Dean’s previous book ‘The Recipient’.

Review: The Recipient

The Recipient, Dean Mayes, Review, Novel, Thriller
Cover picture of The Recipient, by Dean Mayes

This is a contemporary thriller with a subtle, but important supernatural element to it, and sat mainly in Melbourne: so far, quite different from the Artisan Heart.  However, it also has strong, nuanced and believable characters, which Dean gets you to care about very quickly.  He reminds me of Nevil Shute in that respect.

The book also delivers on the thriller front, with a tough, driven heroine, who gets herself into some dangerous situations. There are also some interesting family dynamics, several characters who may have mixed motives and a well rounded, but lethal, villain.

Anyway, I hope that I’ve whetted your appetite!. Now I must get on with reading The Artisan Heart!

Cheers, Simon

Wholehearted

Wholehearted – a sermon on Mark 6 and 2 Samuel 6  (Year B, Proper 10 / Ordinary 15).

Scripture

In Mark 6 and 2 Samuel 6, we have images of people joyfully worshipping God.

  • In 2 Samuel 6, King David has the Ark, the earthly symbol of God, brought to Jerusalem.
    • David has no problem letting God take centre stage in his capital.
    • He dances and celebrates with gusto – abandoning his dignity!
    • Michal despises David, perhaps seeing her loss rather than her people’s gain.
  • In Mark 6 (the almost King) Herod does not want Jesus, the earthly symbol of God, brought to Jerusalem – it was bad enough having him in the country!
    • Herod is a puppet King, put there by the Romans, not God.  He is insecure.
    • He is also a guilty man.  Despite himself, he liked listening to John.
    • Herod put his own comfort and dignity before justice, before God.

Meaning at the Time

Of course, there are two ‘times’ here – OT and NT.

  • When Samuel was written probably already referring to a bygone age:
    • A united powerful kingdom, ‘the good old days’.
    • Yet not a whitewash of History – David’s evil deeds show through too!
    • Lessons from the past, guidance for today and hope for tomorrow.
  • Mark’s Gospel was written down much closer to the actual events.
    • The early church was still working out what it was, where it was.
    • It was growing strongly – not in decline/destroyed like Israel (OT & NT).
    • People are shown that Jesus repeats the OT pattern, perfect/completing it.

Meaning for Today

What do these stories tell us about ourselves, our Nation, today?

  • What is the context – personal, corporate, national?
    • Our church in the UK is in decline, like the UK itself, affecting how we see scripture.
    • Worship/Witness/Work: I’m not good at being wholehearted in worship/witness – I like to be in control; work is OK, I can drive myself to do that.
    • Tony Blair (former UK Prime Minister) criticised by Anne Widdecombe (former UK politician) for not accepting the Roman Catholic Church’s teaching; he replied ‘I am a modern man’: i.e. ‘my reason alone will decide what I believe’.
    • Is our rich western society, that has so much to lose if it were to give up control, afraid of surrendering to God?
  • Our church reminds me of working in the declining Ministry of Defence (declining public sector in general?).
    • We seemed to have no confidence in ourselves, our judgement.  Bewildered!
    • Decisions made for jobs, money, etc, not what really needed for defence.
    • Our leaders had no belief in us!  They were open to outside influence.
    • Can you blame them?  We were not making decisions on what was needed for our mission, but for temporary, narrow, factional advantage.
    • We lost sight of what we should do rather what was expedient to do.

Conclusion

The message from 1,000 years of scripture: let God in! let God rule!

  • We, as individuals and an organisation, can surrender to God with complete confidence.  Let society turn away if it wants to.
  • What difficult things do we need to do to succeed in worship, witness and work?
  • Let us wholeheartedly celebrate putting God first, and thus instructed, guided and inspired, wholeheartedly focus on our mission.

Nothing but Jesus Christ and Him Crucified

Nothing but Jesus Christ and Him Crucified – a Sermon on Mark 8:27-38 (Year B, Proper 19).

Introduction

Tonight is my last preaching engagement at Zion, in the Bristol Circuit and in the UK.  As you may know, we emigrate to Australia at the end of October [I originally preached this in 2012].  (When we prayed about emigrating in church the scripture reading turned out to be Genesis 12:1 “Leave your country, your people and your father’s household and go to the land I will show you”!)  However, I am pleased to end on this passage of scripture.

Scripture – Mark 8:27-38

‘Who do people say I am?’; they say a precursor of the Christ. ‘Who do you say I am?’; Peter says ‘You are the Christ’.  Peter argues with Jesus about his passion – his public suffering and humiliation.  Jesus rebukes Peter, harshly, saying Satan has led him to say that.  He warns his disciples that they must accept suffering, and to finishes with a stern warning – if we are ashamed of Jesus he will be ashamed of us in his glory and judgement.

Meaning at the Time

When Jesus fasted in the desert, the Devil tempted him and failed.

“When the devil had finished all this tempting, he left him until an opportune time.”  (Luke 4:13, NIV.)  Now the Devil returns to tempt Jesus with a way out of his suffering.

Peter means well, he wants his friend the Messiah (my friend the Messiah!) to be spared suffering and humiliation, but behind these human feelings, pulling the strings, as it were, is Satan trying to keep his hold over humanity.  We shouldn’t really blame him, he’s doing his job as accuser, trying to ensure that we get what we deserve.  But he enjoyed his job, his status, a little bit too much.  Perhaps he got carried away in his proud rebellion against God and wanted us to do the same, to think that it was all about what we wanted, that we could choose the kind of God we wanted.  Perhaps he wanted some company, some like-minded subjects to rule over.

Meaning for Today

Today we are offered all sorts of alternatives, options, wisdom, advice and choices.  We live in a pluralistic marketplace, where we are constantly offered more for less, or so it seems.  In this context, isn’t it unreasonable of us to say that there is only one God? That Jesus had to be crucified to save us sinners?  That Jesus is the only way to God?  Aren’t we asking for trouble by saying these things in public?  Shouldn’t we shut up, or at least water down this unpopular message?  Shouldn’t we avoid displaying the cross, that most provocative religious symbol?  Perhaps we should keep quiet for our own good: for our convenience.

Without the cross, Jesus would be just another superior offering wisdom.  With the cross, Jesus is the one who made the sacrifice, who did not grasp for equality with God, as the Devil did.  Instead, he made the sacrifice that gives him the authority to call on humans to do the same.  We do not choose him, like breakfast cereal from the shelf of a supermarket, but he calls on us to choose discipleship and a costly discipleship at that.  He calls us to accept the cross he has chosen for us and pick it up.  It’s the only option he offers.

Conclusion

When I became a local preacher I, very modestly, misquoted St Paul.  ‘For I resolved to know [preach] nothing while I was with you except Jesus Christ and him crucified.’ (1Cor 2:2, NIV.)  Throughout history, this was never a popular message and it’s never going to be, but we haven’t chosen to be popular, we have chosen Jesus, the Messiah, the cross and surrender to God.  God bless us all.  Amen.

Grants Information for South Australian Writers

Yesterday I went to an event run by the Arts South Australia on grants from their Independent Makers and Presenters Program (IMPP).

My thanks to Jennifer Sando on Writers in Adelaide for the tip-off!

Introduction

It was an open panel discussion about project and professional development funding opportunities for independent writers.  About fifteen of us got to learn more about IMPP funding categories, and we got inside tips on how to present a competitive application.

The session focused mainly on Project Grants, for – you guessed it – specific projects and on Individual Development Grants for mentoring opportunities.  A lot of the advice was along the lines of “read the handbook and do what it says”; a handbook or guide is available on the website for each grant category and the ones I read were clear and helpful.

Good Advice on Grants

However, there was also lots of other good advice, for example:

  • You can’t apply for funding to do things that are part of an existing course;
  • Include a one-paragraph synopsis of your intended work;
  • What is your inspiration? What are you exploring?
  • How are you pushing (your) boundaries? Why is this work a strategic choice for you?
  • The Arts SA staff encourage applicants to get in touch with them (contact details on the IMPP website) – indeed few applications succeed without this;
  • The Arts SA staff will read applications for first-time applicants (but NOT in the final week before the submission deadline;
  • You should begin writing your application at least six weeks before the deadline; and
  • About one in three applications succeed!

I felt greatly encouraged to “give it a shot” and apply, even dare I say to try something out of my comfort zone – why not?  Peter Grace and Julia Moretti of Arts SA were excellent, as were Arts South Australia peer assessors Dr Cameron Raynes and Dr Danielle Clode, who had themselves won such grants in the past.  I also know some un/published writers who have won these grants, so there is hope for us mere mortals!

Panel Members

https://arts.sa.gov.au/sites/default/files/public/styles/flexslider-mid/public/field/image/cloderaynes_0.jpg?itok=X1TmIHQr

Dr Cameron Raynes is an Adelaide based writer and educator. His published works include First Person Shooter, The Last Protector and The Colour of Kerosene, for which he received the prestigious Josephine Ulrick Literary Prize in 2008. Cameron currently teaches Aboriginal History, Contemporary Aboriginal Issues and Creative Writing at the University of South Australia.

Dr Danielle Clode is the author of numerous literary non-fiction publications, including Voyages of the South Seas, A Future in Flames and The Wasp and the Orchid. She is the recipient of the Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for non-fiction, Whitley Award for popular zoology and has been shortlisted for the Children’s Book Council of Australia award. Danielle is currently a Senior Research Fellow in the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences at Flinders University.

Further Information

For further information contact Julia Moretti, Arts Development Officer, Independent Makers and Presenters Program on julia.moretti@sa.gov.au